self-compassion

The coronavirus pandemic has reminded me of an important life lesson: Self-compassion is crucial.
Excuse me? Love yourself? Are you crazy? Oh no, no, no, we're far too used to telling ourselves we're too tall, too small, too messy, too lazy, too tired, too fat, too grumpy, too rubbish at parenting, too busy making mistakes.
It's been one of those days. I feel like that rubbish parent who some people cast a withering glance at before inwardly thinking
"Whenever possible be kind. It is always possible," says The Dalai Lama. When life is at its most unfamiliar, depressing or frightening for your family and friends, please don't back away - it's when they need you most.
I went to the gallery and met Tiffany; young, great looking and gushing with sweetness, saying that even though she paid £1,300 she doesn't mind, she wants me to take the computer because it would be bad karma if she didn't give back what was mine.
We've all encountered women who are judgemental. I've heard friends say that 'girls are mean' and 'women are bitchy,' and talk of run-ins with other women that left them emotionally or socially devastated. This is baffling to hear. It is 2017 after all, right?
Valentine's Day is here and you might be frantically thinking about how to show your loved one you care. Or perhaps you're waiting with excitement what they will do for you to surprise you. There's nothing wrong with either of those scenarios - unless you start to let your expectations influence the happiness and love you feel.
I had been recovering from posttraumatic stress disorder, a result of my work as a clinical and forensic psychologist when a stroke hit me out-of-the-blue. Any thoughts I'd entertained of resurrecting my career as a practising psychologist were blown away.
Every time we eat when we are bored, anxious or even happy, we are eating for emotional reasons. We're not eating because we are physically hungry and therefore our body doesn't need to be given food.
In my 20s, I'd tried endless self-help books in an effort to become someone else. I hated that I always felt anxious and lacking confidence. I was determined to rid myself of these defects so that I could finally be happy.