Simone de Beauvoir

Worn on the right person, it is beyond words (although I shall continue to try and capture the essence of this garment using such linguistic containers; limited though they are). Think of Audrey Hepburn in her black turtle-neck in Funny Face. Nothing expresses a sense of gamine joie de vivre better than her in that outfit. She made that sweater iconic.
Feminism is to be brought back on to the curriculum after a Government U-turn forced by an outcry from campaigners and students
So let's return to that young girl in the art gallery for I believe she can, symbolically speaking, help guide us through this tangled maze. Certainly, she provides us with our first important clue, about the many ways that adolescence itself turns so many confident outward- looking girls into anxious and uncertain young women.
Anyone who has seen the online videos of Dapper Laughs - real name Daniel O'Reilly - will be au fait with the misplaced pride in idiocy and the triumphant doltishness of this arch dunce. His act is a woeful, misogynistic celebration of banter-based cretinism that is sadly having a renaissance among the unenlightened, the confused, the intellectually frightened and the simpleton.
Why do we continue to reduce women to their physical image? Simone de Beauvoir once said "...modern woman is everywhere permitted to regard her body as capital for exploitation." Objectification is hurting women.
I was flicking through the Sunday supplements the other day, when something in The Times magazine caught my eye. It was an article by Clover Stroud entitled 'Stand by Your Man' with the background image of a 1960s style woman who had the blankest expression I have ever seen.
The second wave of feminism started in the United States in the 1960s and Simon de Beauvoir was heralded as a touchstone
I often think to myself that it would have been so much simpler to have lived in a time when women didn't have as many choices as they do now. "Spoiled for choice" is not a phrase to take lightly.