Smart city

With fundamental advances in AI technology, smart cities can have their own digital immune systems that fight threats
With fundamental advances in AI technology, smart cities can have their own digital immune systems that fight threats
Smart city technologies are going to change how we use – and value – property in profound ways
A study by Frost and Sullivan shows that the smart cities market globally will grow from just over $900-billion in 2016 to $1.57-trillion in 2020.
With current efforts around the Paris Climate Agreement, sustainability goals are at the top of most governments' agendas. The growth of Earth's population - expected to reach 11 billion people by the end of the century - will also present numerous challenges for natural resources, space and energy, especially when we consider the majority of the population (70%) will live in cities.
As politics is changing and the increasing distaste of the political establishment grows across the world, encouraging the use of this practice can actually make the life of your local MP and elected officials a living hell if you feel they are not living up to their word.
The pace of urbanization globally is unprecedented - by 2050 nearly 66% of the world's population is expected to be urban. The ability to effectively manage this rapid urbanization is critical. Cities must find new ways to increase the efficiency of existing and new infrastructure and services to a level never previously achieved.
With the upcoming Mayor of London and London Assembly Elections taking place on 5 May this year it will be interesting to follow the candidates' proposals to tackle London's issues while retaining its crown as one of the leading cities in the world.
Civic innovation is a great way to force people's hands, let's not be ignored in the decision making process any longer.
There's a revolution occurring in how our urban spaces are managed, but success is less likely to come from grandiose projects and more likely to derive from a series of small improvements... Smart cities are still attainable, but we're learning from experience that the big bang approach isn't always best.