snoopers' charter

The Government’s proposed “snooper’s charter” should be re-written, “undermines” privacy and hands sweeping powers to the
Placing a legal obligation on companies to snoop on their own customers is a recipe for disaster. Not only will it undermine trust, it also gives unscrupulous tech companies ample opportunity to exploit the data they collect for their own purposes under the guise of legal authority.
Legislation has not been altered as a result of Tuesday's judgment. In short, not much has changed. On the positive side, perhaps this week's misinformed media storm will help persuade workers and their bosses to clarify exactly where the boundaries lie concerning personal communications at work.
The 'Snoopers' Charter' is confusing, worrying and for many, just jargon so to try and clear this issue up I chatted with Richard Anstey, EMEA CTO at Intralinks, a secure online collaboration platform to find out.
The Home Secretary Theresa May has confirmed that the controversial Investigatory Powers Bill or the 'Snoopers' Charter' will
The snoopers' charter has been much derided. My gut reaction is that the critics are right. But at least our lawmakers are taking the public's concerns seriously and are going to extraordinary lengths to make the right decision.
Apple has taken its first step in what will almost certainly be a long and drawn out conflict of words with the British government
Labour is threatening to oppose new government spying powers unless documents related to the "political motivated show-trial
Now that every aspect of our day to day lives is conducted online, our homes and cars are connected to the internet and data is the very life blood of society, it's no longer a case of nothing to hide nothing to fear.
Mehdi Hasan has eloquently countered calls for an increase in surveillance after the terror attacks in Paris, arguing: "That's