syria crisis

After Rio I learned to embrace the nametag. I don’t see it as an insult - it’s just a name for ordinary people who were forced to flee their homes like and my family
The young girls caught up in the Syrian conflict need to be given the opportunity to receive an education, for their own future and for the sake of the future of Syria as a whole
Seven years on, we want to tell the stories of the most vulnerable victims in a war that refuses to go away
"It is suffering that cannot be described in words, the words cannot describe the horror we have been through. War destroyed
As a child growing up in the United Kingdom, I remember feeling annoyed when the "Back 2 School" adverts started emerging on our television screens, informing me that my days of making sand castles, eating unhealthy amounts of ice-cream and roller-blading up and down our cul-de-sac were coming to an end.
My memories of the Jungle are now eight months old and have been somewhat clouded by the harrowing stories of our clients as well as the hundreds of hours put into representing them since our visits. Last week, however, these memories came flashing back.
With no friends and no school place, as the rest of my family seemed to be moving on I became very isolated from the outside world. My education had always been important to me. As a young girl I always knew it was my ticket to independence and those rejections left me feeling hopeless. Four months went by that way.
Gulwali Passarlay is a speaker, activist and former refugee from Afghanistan who came to Britain in 2004, aged just 12. In this vlog for HuffPost UK, Gulwali talks about his journey through ten countries as a refugee, what it feels like to flee your homeland, and why we have a moral duty to aid the thousands of refugees dying at sea on their quest to find safety.
It's difficult to overcome that stubborn sense of helplessness when confronted with the staggering realities of this war, particularly in the age of Brexit and Donald Trump. How can we conceivably make a lasting difference knowing that almost half a million people have died since the conflict erupted in early 2011, and that roughly five million have had to flee their homeland, oftentimes perishing along the way? What can we possibly do? Crowdfunding can't end wars. But donating to one of the many charities that support Syrian refugees, including Homes for Syrians, is a form of action that a lot of us have the privilege to take. Whether it's £5 or £50 or more, every single penny goes a long way.
The number of refugees, asylum-seekers and internally displaced people around the world topped 65 million in 2016, according