unga

The UN Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons is now open for signature (#nuclearban). I wrote about this agreement
Young people have always been leading campaigns without the permission of world leaders. The only way to make this change sustainable is to establish strong partnerships with decision-makers across all levels and develop a mutual respect for youth voices.
One year on from the adoption of the UN's new Sustainable Development Goals, they look something akin to a Rubik's Cube. The 17 Goals, and 169 targets within those, applicable to 193 countries, are a colourful and immensely challenging combination puzzle. One cannot be solved without the others; they are inter-dependent.
Real drug policy changes are possible. As we've seen this year, they often happen at the national level, and UNGASS will be an important moment to think about our collective approach to drugs and drug use, to challenge the prohibitionist regimes that undermine human rights, social justice, and public health. Reform-minded nations like the ones highlighted above can be leaders in that process.
On Friday 25 September, world leaders will meet for the UN General Assembly in New York to launch the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). One major achievement that should not go unnoticed is that the promotion of human rights is infused throughout the 17 new goals and 169 targets. This marks a major shift in our approach to the role of human rights in driving sustainable development. Development must be about more than just measures of poverty and increasing financial resources - it must be about advancing human dignity.
This week the new goal and targets for education from now until 2030 will be set in stone. Here, we present some initial
Nutrition is both a maker and marker of development. Yet, undernutrition continues to hamper the ability of children to live happy, healthy lives and reach their full potential. Millions of children - 52 million to be exact - suffer from acute malnutrition.
Women around the world are still facing some of the worst discrimination imaginable. From child marriage to female genital mutilation and inexcusably high rates of maternal mortality, the list goes on. As we approach International Women's Day, it doesn't seem like there is much to celebrate.
It goes without saying that preventing sexual violence in conflict is not an easy task. The declaration adopted yesterday represents an important step at the political level, which should not be sniffed at. Yet how it translates into action in the DRC peace process, and in funding for those working to prevent and respond to this violence on the ground, will be the test of its rhetoric.
I believe we have reached a watershed moment on disability - one which we cannot afford to get wrong. Development progress is only as good as the weakest member and progress made across the world is diluted if the most vulnerable are left behind. If developing countries are to move forward into prosperity and greater self-reliance, they must take everyone on the journey.