Visual effects

Sergey Koudryavtsev admitting killing them after a row over his dog Enzo.
Generous tax breaks make the UK a cost-effective option for filmmakers. But it's the unarguable talent - and their embrace of technology - that has made London a sure-fire guarantee of quality.
If you haven't seen "Interstellar" by now then you'll almost certainly have seen a picture of Gargantua, the enormous black
'Game of Thrones' is excellent television. It is also, essentially, a video game. That's the conclusion we've drawn from
Film is dead. Long live television. That's the bleak assessment of dozens of articles on film-making in the last couple of years. The truth is, there's never been a more exciting time to be a filmmaker.
Within the span of human memory, special effects at the movies have gone from firing a rocket at the face of the Moon to
Throughout my film-going life, effects have been if not quite a dirty word for certain audiences, then one met with a weary roll of the eyes. But I've also always felt the snottiness around effects arose because they reminded critics in particular of the movies' origins as a circus entertainment, a trashy diversion designed to thrill sensation-hungry crowds.
Want an insight into the amazing work of movie visual effects teams? Just watch this video, uploaded to Vimeo by Chris Godfrey
I've been working in the VFX (Visual Effects) industry for many years now and I've seen it grow from a world of a few mad scientists, working with rooms of computers and pushing a few pixels around, to legions of artists, animators and programmers all around the world working on the latest blockbusters.