wannacry

The reality of the situation is that society is not yet comfortable with embracing the technology we have watched destroy or take over the world in films time after time. But it is now becoming increasingly obvious that our negative perception is standing in the way of the potential for positive digital transformation and is an issue technology companies must address, if we are to embrace emerging technology.
Data. We send and receive so much of it on a daily basis that we almost don't think about it anymore. As long as it reaches its destination, we don't think about what happens to it in-between, or even consider who may have access to it.
The British computer expert who helped shut down a world-wide cyber attack that crippled the NHS will appear in a US court
For many people, WannaCry was the first they had heard of ransomware. Many others had just a vague awareness of the problem and the potential damages that ransomware can inflict.
The answer is that using such consumer focused tech to have clinical discussions is often illegal as it is could potentially breach the UK Data Protection Act, not to mention the NHS Act 2006, the Health and Social Care act 2012 and the Human Rights Act.
Ransomware like WannaCry is on the rise. These attacks involve hackers holding your digital files hostage and demanding payment for you to get them back. It poses a dilemma that no one hopes to face. Should you pay up if you fall victim to a ransomware attack?
That's when it hit me: something must be done about the woeful lack of security and privacy we face while using all those connected devices in our homes. Putting a band-aid on every smart home device you own isn't an option. You can't plaster over the vulnerabilities and backdoors that exist in many of the smart connected devices we use at home.
There are also wider lessons for any other business or organisation - given the dependency of all institutions on IT systems, the large numbers of users and devices that connect to those systems and the increasing requirement for 'always on' capability. This blog post will address five key observations that are aimed at stimulating planning and thinking.
The devastation began Friday (12th May), when an estimated 57,000 computers were infected. But the fast-moving and apparently random malware continued to spread throughout the weekend, nearly quadrupling the number of infected systems, impacting all verticals including schools, hospitals, public services, auto makers and more.