Wildlife trade

Amid a lethal outbreak, China faces growing calls to ban wild animal markets for good.
Authorities seized 8.8 tonnes of elephant ivory in the city-state, which conservation groups consider a transit point for the illegal wildlife trade. The ivory, which came from nearly 300 African elephants and was worth an estimated £10.4 million, was on its way to Vietnam. The haul also contained 11.9 tonnes of pangolin scales, the third major seizure in Singapore this year alone.
The Government's ivory ban consultation will run for 12 weeks, closing on December 29. It is vital that a ban is introduced as time really is running out for elephants and we in the UK have a part to play.
It's been a busy few weeks for wildlife globally! At the very end of April, Kenya made a statement to the world that there
This week Hong Kong officials incinerated the first batch of ivory, from a 29.6 tonne stockpile, which in January 2014 they committed to destroy over a two year period. There are those that will question this move, claiming that destroying ivory stockpiles acts to increase the value of remaining ivory. The reality however is very different.
Broken bones, crushed internal organs, limb loss, suffocation, dehydration, starvation, malnutrition, disease, chronic stress and fear. These are just some of the concerning injuries and conditions that are experienced by animals associated with wildlife trade.
Some private rhino owners are calling for the international trade ban... to be lifted so that the stockpiles of horn from rhinos who have died or been dehorned can be sold off.