Women in STEM

I can only hope that small changes in perception, attitude and most of all confidence like these, repeated over and over again in homes across the world, will result in more girls feeling more confident about science, and families feeling more positive (and less scared!) of tackling a science activity themselves.
When asked, only seven per cent of parents said that they would encourage their girls to be engineers - despite the fact that girls show an active interest in STEM subjects from an early age. Could it be that parents are limiting their children's future career choices through outdated perceptions of the jobs they think girls and boys are interested in?
The idea that science is better suited to males is not only unfair and outdated, but could potentially damage the future of our energy supply. We need the skills of both male and females to be able to make the breakthroughs necessary to deliver affordable energy sustainably, meaning a diverse workforce is key.
Civil engineering and construction doesn't need to be the preserve of men. I am a woman. A woman who has worked in design offices, in different countries, with universities, and out on construction sites: I am at a complete loss as to why construction would not suit women.
Engineering is a great and rewarding career for women. I have never experienced discrimination during my career, and in fact, many of my most successful colleagues are women.
At this time of year, with the latest devices and gadgets packed, parceled and delivered, it's easy to take for granted all
IT started out with lots of women being involved. But somehow we have ended up in a place where less than 13 percent of the STEM workforce today is made up of women. More than four times as many boys study STEM at A-level or university and even fewer girls pursue a related career.
In recent years, Barbie has been accused of promoting an unrealistic body-type and negatively influencing young girls. So
It is well-documented that the UK needs more engineers and technologists. WISE says the country produces 36,000 fewer engineers than it needs every year. A CBI survey earlier this year found that 39% of businesses with STEM vacancies were finding it difficult to fill those roles. Something in the supply and demand of STEM skills is out of whack.
We want to show young people that maths and science can open up endless possibilities for their future - and for Britain's future too. Our plan for education will ensure that we equip every child with the skills and knowledge they will need to succeed - and our message is that maths and physics can get them there.