World War Two

These incredible before and after pictures show the true horror and heroism of a day that changed the world. On June 6, 1944, Allied soldiers descended on the beaches of Normandy for D-Day, in an operation that marked the beginning of the end of a devastating six-year conflict and the eventual victory over Nazi Germany in World War Two.
My father, Nicholas Winton, witnessed the appalling conditions children were enduring in the refugee camps in Czechoslovakia in 1939 and determined to give them the chance of a better, safer life by bringing them to Britain. Those who have travelled across Europe to Calais, to escape the life-threatening dangers of their home country, are hoping desperately to find the sanctuary their parents dared to believe Britain would once again offer.
The truth is the bombs didn't just drop from the sky - they were dropped by the United States on civilian populations. And the reality is that - contrary to conventional wisdom about the bombing - they were not necessary to bring about an end to the war. It is a recognition of this truth that is most essential. It is essential even beyond an apology, but it is what makes an apology necessary. The 'necessity of the bombing to end the war' is the foundational falsehood of the nuclear age, and it needs to be exposed and finally laid to rest.
This year's theme for Holocaust Memorial Day is 'Don't Stand By', and of course, the heroics of Sir Nicholas Winton - he was knighted for his efforts in 2003 - naturally spring to all of our minds when we consider what it means to stand up and be counted. We know, unfortunately, that prejudice, intolerance, racism, even antisemitism, continue to blight out world. Genocide, we know, has happened since the Holocaust, and murderous regimes continue to hold power throughout the world.
A labyrinth of subterranean tunnels beneath London’s Clapham South Tube station that offered shelter to local residents during
Chocolate bars, cans of motor oil and thermos flasks - all seemed perfectly innocuous during the war years but newly-discovered
We respected them so much. The pilots were friends to the ground crew - we were sort of drinking out of the same cup - we were all living together, we spent our lifetime at the dispersal points - the pilots had their rooms and we had ours - but we were always so friendly.
As the nation commemorates the 75th anniversary of the Battle of Britain this week and we honour those RAF veterans who, as Churchill said, "cast a glittering shield" to protect Great Britain, the RAF Benevolent Fund and its generous supporters worldwide have rallied in support the RAF family.
It is believed that the unexploded bomb was found at the Westfield London Phase Two site, which is being developed next to
Churchill's ability to capture the public imagination, his capacity to put the Hitler offensive into a grand historical perspective, and his qualities as a seer, each had something to do with his being, at heart, a writer. Yet ultimately it was his deep knowledge of Britain's military capacities, both its strengths and weaknesses, that informed the strategies which proved decisive in the war.