Basic income

Scepticism is misplaced – UBI would offer a lifeline to those worst affected by the Covid-19-induced economic slump, writes Steve Jeffels.
The world's most prominent trial of universal basic income has ended and the first results are out.
Test subjects were paid €560 a month, regardless of their income.
In Britain, more than in the rest of the world, debate around universal basic income (UBI) has sometimes been constructed
It fails to address or tackle the fundamental economic problem we are faced with
Many think it would work better than standard benefits.
In a chaotic world of dividing political views and rising inequality, it comes as no surprise that the term universal basic income has been thrown around incessantly in an attempt to see it as the missing 'cure' to the mess in some of the world's leading economies.
Would a progressive alliance make much difference? Opponents of the idea argue that, for the Tories to be defeated, most seats need to move from Conservative to Labour, so the aim must be to persuade Conservative areas to switch sides. This is a category error - it looks at seats when it needs to look at votes.
In the same way, if all those highly skilled, motivated workers destined to work on Hinkley or Trident had the opportunity to decide for themselves how to participate in the economy, their combined output would undoubtedly be far more valuable than the two vast nuclear white elephants that are now in prospect.
This year I took my topless comedy show 'Sextremist' to the Edinburgh Fringe partly in thanks to financial backing from the
There is a crisis in the British Labour Party and it is not just the internal struggles of the hard versus the soft left
Whether as entrepreneurs, artists, carers, inventors, makers, designers or anything else, if we are to fulfil our potential and make our contribution to society we need the time and opportunity to develop every aspect of our talents, capacities and personalities. The Universal Basic Income isn't about picking winners, but acknowledging that everybody has the capacity to win.
The crucial point is this. The basic income is not paying people for their otherwise unpaid work: it is providing them with the financial investment that makes it possible for them to do it. Investment in people is not "something for nothing", but sound economic practice. It is also what people deserve.
So there we have it. Some men are more equal than others - in exposure to tax liability, at least. The Panama Papers have revealed just how deviously and unethically many wealthy individuals protect their assets, reduce their exposure to tax, and pay as little into or back to their communities as they can get away with.
If the Chancellor does nothing, or too little, he will be forever tainted as the worst kind of Tory - the kind that merely seeks to entrench advantage for the benefit of his own class. But if the Chancellor were to adopt this simple 10 point plan he could become the best kind of Tory - a new Peel or Disraeli. The choice is, almost entirely, his.
Basic Income is a serious proposal necessary to address many of the economic problems facing the developed world. Let us
The previous Government launched an all out attack on disabled people's income and support. They were the number one target
We are a deeply sick society. Mental health has become something of a cause célébre of late, with politicians of various persuasions chomping at the bit to add their voice to calls for increased funding for mental health care.
Citizen Income is the best solution to the injustices of our current tax and benefit system; but as Abba Eban once said, "Men and nations behave wisely when they have exhausted all other resources."
To be truly radical, the Greens should insist on work for all who want it and income for all who need it, expounding the humane maxim, from each according to ability, to each according to need.