Ben Cooper

In the run up to Christmas we will see more questions asked of the BBC and there will be plenty more speculation about the future broadcasting landscape of the UK. However, one thing is certain this year - radio remains vital in people's lives. Radio showed everyone that it is still the place in the media that is busy with innovation, has famous names people want to talk about and stations that millions of listeners are passionate about.
Looking at today's Rajar figures is like a publisher only looking at the book sales from a high street bookshop, rather than taking into account how they are doing on Amazon. Or nearer to home, a singer who only looks at CD sales, rather than taking into account digital downloads, streaming and ticket sales. Young people still love music, young people still love hearing about what is important in their lives and young people still love Radio 1 - they are just consuming it in different ways. Radio 1 is the biggest radio station in the world on YouTube.
Sixty-three per cent of Radio 1 listeners over the age of 30 claim to be parents, so there will be a lot of shared listening with teenagers - as any frazzled parent will testify to keeping their offspring happy in the car or kitchen by putting their station of choice on. That issue of shared consumption really messes with judging the success of your brand by average age, just look at the average age of a CBeebies viewer who is 27 years old. So, if you are looking for a better way of assessing whether Radio 1 is successful at attracting 15-29yr olds, maybe you should look at mode, the most common age of a listener, which is 17 years old.
Jeremy Paxman has been told to "take the stairs" by the controller of Radio 1 Extra after the Newsnight presenter complained