bigotry

“This is my country not yours, and you’ll soon all be gone anyway” – with one sentence from a stranger over brunch, I was left unsure of my place in this country
Well, we got there in the end. Sort of. It has taken Theresa May two full days to say "I think Donald Trump is wrong in what he said about Sadiq Khan, in relation to the terrorist attacks on London." A meek, one sentence response that typifies May's approach to tackling divisive rhetoric: lacklustre and feeble.
Here's the deal: let's swap passports. Before you say no, hear me out. You would fit in perfectly in Trump's America. You even promised to move here if he was elected, so you and I both know this is what you want.
Our liberal counterparts in the older generations must join us. This is a revolution for everyone who believes in tolerance and progressiveness. We must challenge every instance of bigotry we encounter. We must never stay silent when prejudice is voiced. We must put pressure on our politicians, our corporations, and our acquaintances to endorse liberal values. Arguments now are better than wars later.
History repeats itself. The day after the Brexit referendum, left-leaning publications rushed to justify the vote as an anti
Just think of the positive impact an out gay man in the Premier League could have, not just in helping young football supporters struggling with their own sexuality, but in gaining LGBT allies among straight fans. Let's hope that Gazidis will be proven correct in his prediction sooner rather than later, and that we won't have to wait five whole years.
In post-Brexit Britain when there will be natural economic uncertainty, our political class and media establishment have an historic obligation to keep our country safe from bigotry by being positive, robust and wise in their discourse.
To discriminate against people on the basis of their place of birth is prejudice and once upon a time it was illegal in this country. Your party shames the memory of our heritage, shames the country it claims to represent and shames me. I hope it shames you too.
There is no doubt that the repercussions of this historic vote will be felt for many years, and potentially decades, to come. But this decision of over 17 million people must be respected and we must remain positive. Now is not the time for fall outs. Unity, stability, reconciliation and tackling of inequality and bigotry must be our priorities post-Brexit.
So welcome back Nigel Farage: the face of acceptable bigotry and daytime drinking. It looks like we missed you.