blind

Last weekend I was walking along the road with my good pal Gribbo minding our own business when someone shouted, 'fair play lads'. I am unsure what this congratulation was for. We were both walking with our white canes flying all over the place, slowly meandering back towards the safety of my home.
Recently I was flying out of Heathrow and Uffa, my darling guide dog, and I had been parked at the International Departure Lounge where we were to wait for an hour or more until someone came to collect us and deliver us forth. it was 20 minutes into our wait when it happened. 'The Drive by Blessing'
When I went blind, I really did think that my life was over because it cost me my business, my home and my freedom. It put me in such a bad place, mentally. Now, thanks to Oscar and Guide Dogs, I'm planning for the future again and I'm gradually getting back to the old me.
It's barely the end of January and already, 2017 is proving to be a brilliant year. Why? Because I've been partnered with a wonderful yellow labrador called Oscar. Before that, I hadn't left my home on my own since I lost my sight completely eight years ago.
You have no control over so many things when you lose your vision, which is particularly painful for a control freak like me. Even simple things like making toast can be a challenge - I've buttered quite a few kitchen worktops in my time!
I just haven't had the confidence to learn how to use a white cane. I hate the clicking sound it makes as you go, and I don't want to draw that attention to myself. Instead, Elaine has learned how to guide me - partly through the internet, partly trial and error.
On Saturday night my boyfriend and I went out for a meal in the city. It was an expensive 3 course meal, including wine and cocktails. But there was something different about this dining experience which set it apart from, and made it superior to, all others. We dined at Dans le Noir? in Farringdon, in the pitch black, and had no idea what we were eating.
It can become incredibly frustrating considering that these dogs are given to people like myself to enhance our quality of life and enable us to become more mobile. When these access denials occur our mobility is prevented and our freedom of movement is hindered.
Every 15 minutes, someone in the UK begins to lose their sight, that's almost 2million people in the UK. October 8 was World Sight Day, and in London this was celebrated with a very unique music event called Sound For Sight, at The Tabernacle, in Notting Hill, and on October 14 a similar event will take place at The Mint in LA.