cafod

Kamala Thalea lost her son, two daughters and her mother when a devastating earthquake hit Nepal one year ago. She said, "My family and old life are gone now, I only have my eldest daughter left with me."
CAFOD, the development agency I lead, began campaigning on climate change long before the links between poverty and the environment were established. We listened to our partners on the ground telling us that extreme and unpredictable weather was pushing vulnerable people over the edge...
Three months may have passed since the first earthquake hit, but it's important that we don't forget the many people who are still in urgent need. It will take years for Nepal to recover completely, and the scars brought about by the earthquake run deep. But with the help of organisations like CAFOD and Caritas Nepal, as well as hundreds of other charities and the Nepali government, there is no reason why this beautiful, hopeful and proud country cannot be rebuilt.
The brave women I met were in a dire situation. They needed to salvage as much brick, rubble and corrugated sheeting as possible in order to rebuild their homes - and to search for their valuable possessions before the monsoon rain washed them away. This salvaging and rebuilding all takes time and energy that they don't have. They are living a hand-to-mouth existence; if they don't work the land they have no money and no food - and they also have to cook, tend the animals, clean clothes and care for the children.
This Easter Christians have an opportunity to reflect on the message of Christ's redemption and commit to putting their faith into action by tackling the injustices that keep many millions of people from a life lived in all its fullness. In the past, people of faith have been seminal in bringing about social change.
Greener than many of its neighbours, and home to both the highest mountain range in Africa and the source of the mighty Nile, Winston Churchill famously described Uganda as the 'Pearl of Africa'. Unlike much of the country, however, due to its harsh climate and low annual rainfall, the Karamoja region is predominantly a semi-arid plain - causing many problems for the communities who live there.
A controversial new anti-austerity campaign by one of Britain’s biggest charities sparked a furious debate this week over
The world over, we are seeing ever more cases of extreme weather, from the recent floods in the UK to wild fires in Australia. With each incident comes the familiar assurances that - this time - the necessary action will be taken to make sure there is no repeat. The reality is we have no choice, as every country faces the fact that climate change - and its impact on the weather - is no longer a distant prediction, but a daily reality. And for the poorest people on the planet, the need to change is not just a matter of saving money, but saving lives.
In the days leading up to 15th March, the third anniversary of the start of the conflict, people all over the world will be holding vigils to remind their governments that giving up on Syria is not an option.