caitlin moran

It is safe to say that femininity in its many forms has changed a lot over the past few decades. I think it’s also safe to
It is safe to say that femininity in its many forms has changed a lot over the past few decades. I think it’s also safe to
I don't think I was ever not basically a feminist. The femands (that was a genuine typo but I'm keeping it in) have never seemed unreasonable to me. I do think the extent to which I felt involved and the degree to which I appreciated the problem have both changed for the better this year, and these changes have much to do with twitter.
Theresa May, we're now aware, is a "bloody difficult woman". Or so Ken Clarke says anyway. He was caught on camera discussing the Tory party leadership candidates with his old chum Sir Malcolm Rifkind, on Tuesday. He chuckled as he added: "But then you and I worked for Margaret Thatcher..."
One morning last year, my year 13 form tutor told us she wasn't a feminist. Silence descended. Noticing the distinct lack of approving nods and the much more emphatic shiftiness and thumb-twiddling before her, our teacher hastily added "but obviously I believe in gender equality." She couldn't have paid us to keep quiet.
Caitlin Moran is very busy. As well as the second series of Raised By Wolves on Channel 4, there's her new book Moranifesto and she is working on two films with John Niven of Kill Your Friends fame.
They are acting with the universal desire to not die horribly or to live miserably...'
Caitlin Moran has recorded a scathing video response to refute the argument refugees in Europe are to blame for the Brussels
Sadly, both Fuck0ffee and Bricklane Coffee, appear to have misunderstood the time-old saying that "any publicity is good publicity" and, in doing so, to have missed a very simple truth: If you want to stand out in London's over-saturated independent coffee market, insulting 52% of the population isn't the best way to go about it. It's bad marketing, bad PR and, worst of all? It's not even funny.
Suddenly it's okay to attack the baby-boomers, describing them as the "lucky" generation and therefore a legitimate target for some serious abuse.