Chatbots

As the election looms, the familiar education, education, education mantra is loud and proud - promises of more funding for primary schools, grammar schools and the abolition of tuition fees. But as intelligent machines silently march on and integrate discreetly into the fabric of our workplaces, where is the investment for education and skills for our adult workforce?
We're living in an age of obsession with measuring every aspect of what we do. From hours of sleep, number of steps, and calories consumed, to monitoring our emotional state. New innovations and technologies being unveiled at a rapid pace makes this incredibly easy for people to do.
In this age of ever-changing tech, consumers want a quicker, easier and more personal experience when dealing with brands. Now, consumers are enjoying the fastest way to reach a brand the world has ever seen - chatbots.
This is no way means an end to all customer interaction. That is here to stay. This means the creation of a better approach, which moves customer interaction away from the flawed model of today towards a more useful set of interaction for both the client and the company. To achieve this would require two solutions.
Science, technology, engineering and mathematics - STEM disciplines - are the backbone of tech innovation. Yet, bringing tech such as AI from the lab to the home calls for a selection of experts who are not always part of the equation.
Technology has been "stealing our jobs" since at least the Bronze Age, so it's surprising after all these years that any of us have a job to go to in the mornings. The tired old trope of machines stealing the bread from our children's mouths has been trotted out at intervals since the time of Ned Ludd (at least), and the reason it keeps getting an airing is simple: it plays on our fears and insecurities - and it makes great copy. This does not, however, make it true.
User-generated content, bring your own device and big data were some of the fastest growing EdTech topics of 2016. Here are eight ideas and expert predictions for the year ahead.
Sometimes the platform's suggestions just don't cut the mustard...
Netflix’s algorithm is pretty hot. Maintained by more than a thousand staff, the product offers tens of millions of users
Chatbots will have already arrived in the lives of students (they've been appearing in Facebook Messenger and WhatsApp for some time) but what do teachers need to know? Should you be thrilled or fearful about the prospect of bots in the classroom?