Education policy

In a Britain of spiralling living costs, insecure employment and massive inequalities, free bus travel is the sort of radical policy that will redress the balance
The government has announced for the third time in 15 years that they intend to impose a baseline test on four-year-old children
Education needs better, fairer funding. It needs stability, not change for its own sake and increased uncertainty. It needs recognition of actual problems and innovative thinking in solving them. This can only happen if channels of communication between all those who have a stake in the education community are kept open. Whoever is in office, we must make sure that the education debate continues.
Election fever has begun. Well, less of a fever and more of a virus at the moment. The manifesto writers are busy locked in darkened rooms trying to shape their political parties' ideas and offers. According to the media and political pundits the main subject of the election is Brexit but a general election needs to address domestic bread and butter policy as well.
The Department for Education's recent announcement that Sex and Relationships Education (SRE) will be mandatory in schools, starting at age 4, is one that may scare some teachers. Sex is often seen as a taboo subject, even in general society, and for a teacher speaking to a classroom full of children delivering SRE could be an embarrassing prospect.
Does your school take part in Science4Society Week? And does STEM learning there reflect the valuable thinking skills young people should develop, and the just and sustainable world we wish to see?
This Christmas, I was poignantly reminded of my school teaching years in two highly unexpected ways. First of all I got, in
2016 will be remembered as a year when established certainties fell victim to the arrival of a brave new world. In the UK
Donald Trump isn't known for keeping his cards close to his chest, but although President-elect Trump has loose lips for most things, education is not one of them. Therefore what little we do know will be key to figuring out what education will look like in America over the next four years.
The purpose of school is to ensure that every child has the possibility of having a great future. This is achieved when each child reaches his/her full potential in learning and well-being so that they can flourish and grow into the kind of adults that they want to become.