end of life

Slowly, painfully slowly, the good days were fewer and fewer, and our visits mainly consisted of us trying to make conversation with someone who barely knew we were there. My grandma would dutifully feed him biscuits when we visited. A woman in the corner of the day room, with white hair that stood on end, screamed periodically like a crowing rooster. The nurses seemed kind.
So why do people make these offhand comments? I think it's a way of denying our mortality. As much as we intellectually know that one day we will die, a deep part of our psyche is fighting that fact. When we say, "It doesn't matter", partly it's because we don't want to admit that one day, inevitably, it definitely will matter.
Friends and family are not being informed when a loved one is about to die in hospitals across England, a new audit has found
I don't know how long Mum has left. I know that she's tired, that she's been battling this illness for a long time and it's not a nice position to be in. We're lucky because we have an amazing network of friends around us who constantly offer lifts, food, hugs, and an ear.
Yesterday's news that 70 per cent of people living with cancer also have at least one other long term condition is yet further confirmation that cancer is now a complex disease. And it is worrying news for a health and social care system which is already struggling to provide the cancer care that people deserve.
Introducing free social care at the end of life is a golden opportunity to improve people with cancer's last experiences, while simultaneously easing the strain on the NHS.
I support the idea of the patient having the option to ask for a lethal dose of drugs to end that suffering - at least that is what I would like to have as an option should I find myself in that position.
Everyone deserves care that works for them and their families at the end of their lives. However, we know that end of life care is not meeting the needs of people from Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) communities, and we are in danger of failing to reach increasing numbers unless urgent steps are taken.
The second reading of the Care Bill this week provides an opportunity for MPs to look at how including a statutory duty for local authorities to fast track funding for social care can be included in the Bill.