european travel

Your guide to exploring Sweden's capital, from indulging in fika to exploring the city's nightlife.
From Ghana to Poland and everywhere in between. Time to get those flights booked.
Here are the top holiday spots, as voted by Lonely Planet, if you’re thinking of staying in Europe this summer. From Icelandic glaciers to Croatian music festivals, this list has you covered no matter what your dream holiday is.
Personal experience will answer that question! Last year my wife & I were travelling in France, when she became very seriously ill. In the middle of the night I had to rush her to the emergency department of the local hospital, whereupon she was seen immediately by the doctors on duty.
It was November so it was cold; long underwear cold. My hotel was sandwiched between the Danube and the Christmas markets. The mulled wine was the perfect fuel for my exploits. I always condone sampling the national drink of choice when exploring a country (no matter the time of day!)
With approximately 2000 ski resorts around the world to choose from, picking just ONE isn't always so easy. A resort that is good for beginners may not be so good for experts. A resort that is good for children may not be so good for nightlife. A resort with traditional charm may be lacking in terrain parks...
I found a secluded spot for this rather epic sunset.. .I'm sure it is rammed during the summer! The only downfall to visiting off season is the public boats do not taxi to the surrounding islands. Only reason to visit again - ideally on a yacht!
I recently look a trip to Amsterdam with my family and wanted to share some of the places we found if you are planning a micro holiday in the city.
The amazing history of Portugal - discovery of India and Brazil, rule by Arabs and Romans- dates back beyond what my American mind can comprehend. The excellent part of staying at this resort in Algrave is the surprising proximity to historical landmarks and monuments.
Train, coach and ferry delays are also subject to compensations imposed by European law, but have received far less publicity. This is for a simple reason: Companies operating trains, coaches and ferries simply pay up when they are responsible for delays. It could really be this simple.