f1

It's got to the point that my excuse cycle has actually come full circle and I've run out of plausible reasons not to leave my house (or bed, for that matter). I have no more pets that urgently need to see a vet, and I can't drive so car-related issues are a non-starter. And everyone knows that phantom relative deaths are next level bad ju-ju.
My passion in life is driving fast...very fast, and as part of the Renault Sport Formula One™ Team's 40th anniversary celebrations
Promoted by Renault
F1 is at the pinnacle of motoring - an elite competition that requires cutting-edge innovation in engineering and tech to propel cars round a track at incredible speeds. The sponsors are the planet's biggest brands, and the drivers are celebs, out-earning most of the world's other high-profile sportsmen and women.
Bernie's era of doing deals by a handshake at the back of a garage has long gone - the sport needs to move with the times to take its appeal to a new generation.
The greatest sport on the planet has a fan-base rich in diversity. Stretching the four corners of the globe, there are millions and millions of us hanging on every press conference, lap, pit-stop and chequered flag. We live and breathe F1 and without this support it's difficult to imagine the sport existing. But all this fascination hinges on one thing: the driver.
Rules are everywhere, and as they say, they're made to be broken. I used to break the rules at school and at home. I got into a bit of trouble, but often it was totally worth it. I think teams will do the same for many years to come, and find ways to get around the ones they don't particularly like.
It has been two weeks since I made the annual pilgrimage of endurance motorsport to the Circuit de la Sarthe, also known
Twenty-five years ago I began watching Formula One and 2016 also marks the 20th anniversary of my childhood hero Damon Hill winning the world title. I will always be a fan of F1 but even though my current favourite driver, Lewis Hamilton, is dominating the sport I find myself waning in interest of the only sport I truly follow with a passion...
It has been an incredible journey with many ups and downs. I feel privileged to have turned my passion into my profession... My gut feeling tells me it is time to move on. Time to explore new challenges and push myself in new environments. As a sportsperson it is always difficult to know when to stop but for me, this journey has come to an end.
The sport is governed by technical regulations which try to keep some form of parity between constructors who enter the sport. The problem is that with such small differences in technical and mechanical advancement, it costs many hundreds of million pounds to find that extra half-a-second of performance.