healthy food

Lactose intolerance is a gastrointestinal condition, recognised throughout the medical community as loss of function in the enzyme lactase that helps us digest lactose, the naturally occurring sugar in cows' milk.
Last week marked World Osteoporosis Day - a condition that affects over three million people in the UK. It is characterised by changes to the structure and density of bones, making them thin, weak and prone to breakages.
The old tricks are the best! Making shapes out of sandwiches, presenting fruit in small colourful containers, adding a fun curly straw to drink their milk with - it all helps to make sure they actually eat everything. After all, children don't get any nutritional benefit from food that never leaves the lunchbox.
We're all used to it by now; when the summer arrives, so do the fashionable diets that claim to completely transform our bodies in a few short weeks. They take over our news feeds, magazine racks and even the supermarket aisles. But is there some truth in the latest summer health trends?
Bone broth is also hydrophilic which means it attracts water and digestive enzymes, thus aiding digestion. There are many cultures around the world which have used stocks and bone broths for medicinal purposes for centuries.
It seems that people have never been as interested in food as they are today. Our appetite to explore new cultures through
When trying to lead a more healthy lifestyle, we often feel like our old, bad habits are tough to break; we set our benchmarks too high, pick unrealistic goals. What about if we could set some healthy foundations that enabled success? Educate ourselves. Adapt our thoughts.
This is the issue. If you weigh yourself and do not like the number you see, you feel less motivated to make healthy choices. Often this causes people to panic, self-berate and emotionally overeat. This toxic cycle of bingeing and restriction causes people to have a very unhealthy relationship with food and their bodies.
I don't mean its flavours and the latest hot spots to eat, but rather the traits of the food itself. This applies particularly to the use of the word 'healthy' - which I have seen used to describe everything from kale to low-fat processed foods.