hinkley point

There is speculation the plan will be scrapped or drastically altered.
Theresa May is heading to China for her first major global summit as Prime Minister, but faces a row with her hosts over
Made in China we get, but how about owned by China as the superpower ratchets up investment in the UK?
I'm delighted to have discovered a leaked 'damage limitation' briefing, sent to David Cameron from advisers, ahead of his meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping this week. The paper gives some useful advice on what Mr Cameron should say to 'extract' himself from a damaging and embarrassing deal involving Chinese finance for nuclear new build...
So the British government's response to climate change is to go nuclear. The Hinkley Point nuclear power station is to be
It’s been four months since Prime Minister David Cameron’s new majority government came into power and there are just three
The message from Beijing is clear: the all-important political will that is so evidently present from Downing Street must be met with an enhanced commitment from Britain's business community.
Whether man-made climate change is occurring or not, there are few who would argue against a move towards low-carbon energy generation. One way or another, carbon emissions must be cut. Forget the tired anti-nuclear rhetoric and the ridiculous claims that a Fukushima-style disaster could hit the UK. Third generation nuclear is the way forward and the new reactors planned at Hinkley Point are the first step in the right direction.
It's been a tense time in the energy sector recently, with the furore over rising energy bills and accusations of profiteering taking over national headlines.
The government this week signed an agreement which means our looming energy crisis will be solved by nuclear power stations built by the French and owned, in part, by the Chinese. This demonstrates the impact of Britain's skills shortage and our lack of ambition. To top it all, they have warned us that the dearth of hi-tech engineering skills in our economy may hold them back. The skills shortage is not a problem confined to the crucially important energy sector, it's systemic. We need more engineers and scientists.