jurgen klopp

Goals! Goals everywhere! Well, on Saturday anyway. Watford and Everton showed Manchester City the way forward, the way forward
Clean sheets have so far come more often for Karius. He has managed a 'shutout' once every three games, while for Mignolet it was an average of 3.8 in his debut season.
Should Gerrard return as a non-playing member of the Anfield staff, which seems at least a medium-term certainty, the Liverpool hierarchy will need to be mindful that his role, whatever it may be, doesn't prove a hinderance to Klopp's existing plans and ideas.
Sunday marked the 30 year anniversary of Sir Alex Ferguson taking over at Manchester United. In the next 30 years Fergie
You can often get a feel for a new manager by the substitutions he makes to change a game. I'd just like to point out that Sam brought on Walcott and left Vardy, yeah you know the one that led Leicester to the Premier League title last season, on the bench. Still, he has taught Lallana to actually hit the back of the net so progress is being made, right?
With the merciless battering of Everton, he emphatically snatched all bragging rights which are precious in a period when Liverpool's superiority complex over the Toffees has been thin at best. Now, he has the opportunity to transform a sometimes torturous campaign into one worth savouring.
It might chafe at Liverpool fans to hear it, but they could do a lot worse than to look to Spurs as a guiding light. The Reds have done the 'overhaul' part of the job over and over again, but they've never stuck around long enough to put in the 'patience' part of the equation.
While Teixeira may solve a particular problem, is he that much better than Firmino, who scored his fair share of goals in a tougher league than Ukraine's and finally appears to have turned a corner after a transitional six months on Merseyside? £38million is an excessive amount to spend on only a slight upgrade - £50million is careless.
Gegenpress. Like a pop star turning up to a school disco, it took the Premier League by storm. No longer had the beautiful, eloquent idea of tiki-taka graced the world of football, than had it been swept aside by its violent, aggressive cousin.
Liverpool won't go down this season. But unless something changes at Anfield pretty soon, fans and players alike are going to have to start looking over their shoulders - and they won't like what they see.