Muslim Brotherhood

Reports say he fainted during a court session and died afterwards.
The sit-in supported former Islamist president Mohammed Morsi.
"Within one day we managed to reclaim this mosque for the community. It is not just a mosque now. It is a community centre for people whether they are Muslims or not. It is about humanity." With these words, the Chair of the Trustees of London's Finsbury Park Mosque, Mohammed Kozbar, opened a news conference of British Muslim leaders this week.
Egyptian President Abdel Fattah Al-Sisi is facing mounting pressure to pardon Morsi or at least to commute the death sentence to a term of imprisonment to save Egypt from a long period of instability and bloodshed, and avoid a gigantic PR disaster.
The otherwise taciturn King has emerged suddenly as a terrifying foe to organized terror.
The intent upon which the law of Universal Jurisdiction in the United Kingdom was developed was to ensure that those persons committing international crimes such as torture, war crimes and crimes against humanity, those crimes that have attained the status of jus cogens, in foreign jurisdictions couldn't escape justice, simply on the basis that that country did not have the appetite or ability to commence such proceedings.
A review flawed from the outset has been shown to have maintained those flaws throughout the process, reaching no real conclusion, unable to shed the spectre of bias, and it would appear resorting to sensationalist articles that lack substance.
Reza Pankhurst's latest work doesn't have the poetic endurance of Shakespeare but its central premise is concerned with the dilemma so eloquently posed by the master playwright in Hamlet. The tragedy of the Danish prince that has endured as a fictional masterpiece of English drama has played out in the Muslim conscious for nigh on a hundred years.
Since their removal from power this time last year, the Muslim Brotherhood has constantly been the focus of Egyptian headlines. But when, in early April, Downing Street ordered an inquiry into the group's 'philosophy, origins and activities', it entered the UK domestic political scene too...
Journalism is not a crime, but in Egypt it now seems to be tantamount to that. Egypt is already incredibly dangerous for journalists (behind only Syria and Iraq, according to the CPJ), and death / jail are becoming major occupational hazards for those daring to report on protests or indeed any anti-government activity. And the clampdown goes on.