muslim women

Wazina Zondon is Muslim and queer. Growing up, she often felt at odds with the intersection of her culture and sexual identity. She shares her experience navigating her two identities, and how she eventually came to embrace them both.
All the tips and tricks from the women who do it best.
'It’s a reminder to Muslim women that we can achieve anything in the world.'
After months of anticipation, Nike’s Pro Hijab is now available to buy in the UK, encouraging more Muslim women to take part
"I want to tell all girls and boys across the world that you should never apologise for being you."
Since 2010, almost 2,000 acid attacks have been reported in London alone. Almost a third of these attacks occurred in the borough of Newham, east London. The majority of these cases have not led to trial, with 74% of cases being shelved due to victims being unable to identify perpetrators.
The internet has transformed the way in which extremists radicalise and recruit, enabling them to reach global audiences in ever more dynamic ways. Vulnerable people, often seeking a sense of identity, are then radicalised through online material or groomed for recruitment. The rise in Islamophobic hate crimes leaves Muslims increasingly isolated and susceptible to radicalisation.
The arguments over how the attackers in London and Manchester were radicalised have veiled the fact that women and young people are tirelessly trying to speak up, and are often ignored. We are sick and tired of being held up as solely victims of gendered violence, when we also fight to stop it, by challenging outdated preachers and reviving new techniques of engaging with maligned people.
Its 11.56pm, after some very long standing for the beautiful night prayers of Ramadan, in one of London's biggest mosque, I open my phone to a barrage of messages asking if I am safe? I then hear the announcement for everyone to be vigilant, as another attack has been reported. If we are all supposed to be praying right now who could possibly be out killing?
Offering a professional platform to exalt modest fashion designers in London was no coincidence. Organiser of LMFW, Franka Soeria said, "London is one of the trendiest places for modest fashion" in the West with a large supportive community.