post-natal depression

Mums should not "be left to suffer in silence", says minister.
One morning I woke up, and the fogginess was gone. For the first time in almost five years, a part of my post natal depression diminished. I could see clearer. The days were not completely cloudy and rainy anymore. As I looked outside at my surroundings, the sun's rays streamed through, making everything I saw look brighter
I hated picturing a mum like I was, stuck at home feeling like she just wants to get out and have some adult conversation - but with nobody local to meet. Let's face it, when you aren't feeling confident some of those baby classes just make it worse! But meeting a fellow mum for a coffee, or soft play, or at the park. That might just be manageable.
I had an awful birth experience. But I didn't die. My baby didn't die. In fact, she is thriving - the brightest, happiest little ray of sunshine you ever did meet. And, almost two years on, here I am, getting the help I need. We all lived to tell the tale. So why does that tale even need to be told any more?
The cruelest trait of anxiety is its ability to creep up and blindside you whilst you're sitting eating your mugshot on a Tuesday afternoon. For me, anxiety started as that feeling of rocking on your chair a little too hard and tipping over the point of balance.
I don't think anybody would disagree that support for parents following trauma should be offered as soon as possible. However, due to an extremely underfunded and overworked NHS, this support is rarely forthcoming.
I know that you want the best for your precious baby. You've spent nine gruelling months providing a safe and comfortable home for the life you and your partner created together. The physical changes, aches and pains and the emotional rollercoaster ride is a challenge for even the most straightforward of pregnancies.
The people around me knew there was a difference but couldn't quite put their finger on it I had a baby, right? Sleep deprivation has a lot to answer for.
She and her RIOT squad where born out of the black dog. To overcome her depression (and hers was pretty bad) Vicky started to run. She is the one that told me that depression is often the curse of the brave - that sufferers are those people who push themselves to the point of breaking.