Psychological trauma

From the loss of a family member to a breakup, many of us have experienced some level of trauma. Clinical psychologist Jennifer Sweeton explains how traumatic events affect your mind and brain. Sweeton also highlights that trauma does not mean you are damaged forever and there are ways you can overcome.
Lucy Pasha-Robinson chats with comedian and cervical cancer awareness activist Karen Hobbs. In this episode, we’re doing things slightly differently – we’re talking about cancer, which is often seen as an acute condition. But as this week’s guest explains, in many ways its effects can be chronic – from living with life-altering sensations, surgery complications, and the long term psychological impact of facing up to your mortality – including learning to cope with a fear of recurrence.
Exclusive: Lib Dems call for “world class” mental health support for staff enduring "life-altering trauma and immeasurable excess stress".
So many women do wonder why no one told them the 'truth' about childbirth. The truth is that women should be in control and understand their options fully
Turning off the television and radio might be a natural protective instinct, shielding children from traumatic events in the news isn’t practical in today’s society
The anniversary of a traumatic event can be a challenging time and it may be helpful to think about the best way to look after yourself
The frontline of a conflict reaches further than where the shells drop
“I thought, you want equal opportunity for women? That also means in this way: looking at the dark side,” Wood says of her role, written for a man.
Yasin is five years old. When I meet him he is attending a session at Baytna (meaning "Our Home" in Arabic) with his two year old brother and his mother who is pregnant. Yasin's father is missing. At the session children play, learn and socialise. But none of these activities come easily to him. He is withdrawn, rarely communicative and clings to his mother.