recruitment

It's that time of year again: leaves are falling, the football season is in full swing, school is starting, and university
Tim Roache of the GMB summed it up well. "We no longer look like the members we need to recruit. And more of the same is not an option. It isn't "one more heave"". He's right. We need to be different. We need to be daring. We need to be brave. Frankly, what's the alternative? What's left to lose?
Problem solving, innovative thinking, good timekeeping and teamwork - these are qualities commonly found in a typical job description. Most of us are able to demonstrate such attributes through examples of past work experience but for many people with a disability, these are all skills that they apply seamlessly to their day to day life.
Figures released last week by The Health Foundation painted a pretty bleak picture of the impact of Brexit on the NHS - they
In today’s merciless job market, it’s definitely a matter of survival of the fittest. The job seeker who continuously adapts will strengthen their brand.
Flexible working itself requires highly sought-after skills, and we should not be afraid to draw this to the attention of recruiters and employers. We will need to prove ourselves and the value we bring. We are a flexible working PR and Communications consultancy, and here are some of the lessons we have learnt from our own experience:
If we are to contribute to the workforce in healthy ways that fairly recognises and rewards our talents and potential, surely parents shouldn't be penalised for dipping out of employment and suffer the longer term impact on their employability.
Last year was undoubtedly a year marked by unprecedented global change. As well as President Trump's unexpected electoral
Look at me! Pick me! Listen to me! The tendency of the modern world is that those who shout loudest get the furthest. For