safer internet day

'We want to make sure that every young person feels equipped and empowered.'
Asking students yesterday about the earliest time they logged on that morning, most admitted to waking early for fear of missing out (FOMO). The adrenaline rush they receive from posts being "liked" can become addictive and sleep is the casualty.
Growing Up Digital recommends that digital citizenship should be taught from the age of four to fourteen with a voluntary extension for older children, which would show the way to get the best out of the internet.
This is a vicious cycle that needs to be broken, for if we don't we are already reaching an impasse that threatens to plunge us deeper into the dark vaults of internet and with that into greater destruction, something we absolutely must look now.
The internet is one of our greatest inventions - a powerful tool that children and young people can use to learn, to express themselves and explore the world around them. However, protecting them from the risks they might face online or on their phones is vital. You wouldn't let your child go off to meet a stranger or put themselves in a risky situation - and the same rules apply to the online world. Some children are visiting adult chatrooms, viewing inappropriate content and in some cases being bullied by peers or even - in extreme situations - radicalised, and we need to protect them from these risks.
Tackling the broader cybercrime challenge needs an orchestrated response. I wanted to highlight three ways in which law enforcement agencies are working with each other and other organisations (including my own) to tackle the real and very present danger represented by opportunistic and organised criminals online...
The internet is a great source of information and a place for children to learn, develop new skills and play fun games. However, we also know from our report 'Digital Dangers', that the increase in internet use and new technologies brings risks for children and young people...
Children from the age of five are in fact using shared school platforms, instant messaging, social gaming and even photo-sharing sites - all places we may consider to be generally 'safe'. However, in reality this is exactly where children may be most exposed to the risk of cyber-bullying, and we might not even know about it.
The best source of help for children in these situations is usually their parents. Whether your child is being bullied or bullying others, it's important to know what's going on in their lives you so can help address the issue and any potentially larger problems behind it.