stereotypes

“They just couldn’t understand why would a Black guy want to go down and buy a farm in Devon.”
"Working class children often lack the appropriate attitudes that are necessary to succeed in education."
You can’t teach an old dog new tricks, they say...
An analysis of 100 websites found nine in 10 images showed women in a negative light.
PepsiCo’s CEO said men enjoy licking Dorito dust off their fingers with “great glee,” but women don’t. Oh, and that women “don’t like to crunch too loudly in public.”
Hoodlum. Big for nothing. Dyslexic. Under-achiever. Lower-class. Poor. Fat boy. Hot head. Loud mouth. Young carer. IC3 Male. Panda - what the bullies called me. And Bison - my street name. All of these labels reflected assumptions about me by individuals who didn't understand the behaviour I exhibited, the music I listened to, the culture I came from or the enormous responsibilities I was carrying as a young teen.
I was not born into this body to be oppressed. I was born into this body to be of service. To help, heal and empower. Shine my light so brightly that you can't ignore me.
With a plethora of actors voicing their opinions and raising awareness I do believe there are people listening, but with most issues, there are deep rooted and there no quick fixes. For me, it is about asking questions when it came to storylines and vision of a particular project, not being so quick to settle on what is comfortable and familiar and taking action where an action is due.
I believe that identifying with the term 'disabled' is a personal choice. But it is important to recognise that there is no right way to be disabled. The disabled community is diverse, as are the lives of those within it.