Street children

In 2016, Sierra Leone was ranked in the 10 worst countries to be a girl in terms of gender inequality. Girls in Sierra Leone
A few months ago, Railway Children was invited by the producers behind the Hollywood film Lion to be its charity partner
Not surprisingly, we are also seeing that the presence of responsible adults who are available to these young people and who represent reliable role models often give that added value upon which fresh ideas in prevention can then be built.
As their shock 7-1 defeat sinks in, debates rage here about whether or not Brazilian football is in crisis, and whether the blame can be laid at the feet of Scholari, FIFA or the President herself, Dilma Rousseff.
There are many millions of children living or working on the streets. They are found in every continent and every country. But whether they live in Mumbai, Manchester or Mexico City, they can face many of the same daily risks and lack of opportunities often going unseen and unheard.
The Street Child World Cup has competing boys and girls teams, it kicks off on Sunday 30th March in Rio, but unlike this Summer's event, it is the taking part that really does count as every single child participating has had a journey to get there and is already a winner.
Many of us have seen children on the streets when we have been holidaying abroad. Out late seemingly with no place to go. They may be less noticeable here, in the towns and the cities of the UK, but the reality is that 100,000 children here run away from home each year...
The past three months of my life have been engaged in managing and shaping a fascinating project called films4peace, which reaches its fruition this weekend on the UN's International Day of Peace on 21 September. It's an unusual beast: the brainchild of the highly creative South African curator and art historian Mark Coetzee...
UNICEF has put the number of street children living and working on the streets of Brazil as high as two million. As many as one in three of these children will likely die before their 18th birthday.
No one knows how many street children there are in the world. Finding out is one of the first recommendations of the recent UN study on street children to all its member states.
The emergency in Mali has different characteristics than in Niger. There are no camps or large scale food programmes that one sees in the media where thousands of women queue for rations. However, one of the ways in which it is manifested is in child labour. Thousands of children have dropped out of school to go find work to help support the family.
As the world marks the International Day for Street Children today, children in street situations serve as a grim reminder of how one of the most marginalised and vulnerable groups in the world continues to be deprived of their basic rights; failed by governments, institutions and societies.