UK newspapers

Comparing the stories encouraging people to vote to leave the EU to those we've seen in recent weeks paints rather a bleak picture.
If there is an attack and the perpetrator is a so-called Muslim, it gets five times more coverage than were the perpetrator a non-Muslim
If there is an attack and the perpetrator is a so-called Muslim, it gets five times more coverage than were the perpetrator a non-Muslim
As a reporter, I had never before witnessed anything like the Grenfell fire
Good writing is good writing regardless of gender. And yes that is true. Except one can't help wondering why all the brilliant female writers working on the Sunday Times are in the Style and Magazine sections (which are both edited by women). Is that where they're 'meant' to be?
A gay museum for London with a dedicated exhibition of cultural homophobia would help to fill the gaps. Unlike recent curations, this would track expressions of homophobia in the mass media - the media that are most relevant to ordinary LGBT people's daily lives.
It won't be solved by sweeping statements, or by picking a fight with political leaders. Instead it will be solved one step at a time and the first step has to be involving the public - asking where their frustrations are and what they'd like to see more of in reporting.
But for the Guardian, it was caution abound   And while you’re probably reading this on your phone - perhaps today is the
Last month, Wikipedia members banned the Mail as a source - provoking an unusually fierce response from the paper. type=type
The Co-operative Group has held talks with bosses of The Sun and The Daily Mail amid concerns about the papers’ coverage
The Express is a repeat offender.
A slew of rulings by the press watchdog Ipso reveal the extent of inaccuracy and misleading coverage of EU issues in the
What matters more: that an MP has five jobs outside Parliament or that an MP is editing London's top newspaper? George Osborne's appointment as Editor of the Evening Standard has led to an outcry on the first issue - but what about the second? Is that not a problem?
When I was asked by Paul Dacre to become editor of Metro back in 2000, he told me with a mischievous glint in his eye: 'Make it good...but don't make it too good'.
Why would the government launch a public consultation on legislation that Parliament has already passed by an overwhelming majority? Might they be worried that voters are suddenly enraged or alarmed by some terrible injustice? Are they beset by fears of some kind of popular uprising?