utilities

Some have heralded it as the next iteration of a cashless society, a system with the potential to revolutionise archaic methods
World records tumbled in renewable energy this month. Utilities, facing short-term existential threat in the face of clean
As tends to be the case, utility companies will be all over the news agenda this winter, and this year will be no exception with EDF's nuclear reactors offline until the end of the year. However on top of this, a subject that is likely to rumble on is the introduction of so-called smart meters.
Business leaders of course know the golden rule that "the customer is always right" but this isn't always filtering down to some members of staff. And sometimes, it won't even be their fault, simply the consequence of circumstance.
In a better world, we would have a total split between wholesale provision of Utilities and retail sale of access. Massive, international firms would be immune from some anti-monopoly laws as long as they pushed it all forward year on year and could only make money from keeping their retail, consumer facing customers happy.
Why are these critical infrastructure companies failing these tests? After all most of these large organizations are serious about cybersecurity. They run specialized departments tasked with protecting two key networks: data center (servers) and office automation (workstations).
The privatisation of state water companies around the world almost always has one common denominator: it is made ​​under the pressure of international lenders in countries with large debt or under the pressure of multinational corporations and politicians in countries with a strong economy.
Workers are more concerned about losing their internet connection at home than having no heating or water, a study suggests
A takeover of listed UK water companies in the immediate future is unlikely, despite share price spikes and market rumours
I read with interest recently, enthusiastic support for London Mayor Boris Johnson as visionary for proposing to sink Park Lane (Mayfair, London) into a tunnel and to build on the land thus freed-up. Oh dear, environmental awareness certainly escapes Boris!