Viktor Orban

Boris Johnson welcomed the Hungarian PM - one of Europe's most divisive figures - to Downing Street on Friday.
Across Europe voters need to wake up to what is happening to LGBT+ rights and freedoms because the evidence is there: we are sliding backwards.
President Trump believes migrants from Mexico and central America are ‘infesting’ the US. His choice of words is chilling
As Viktor Orbán looks set for a third consecutive term in power, there is widespread concern about hateful rhetoric and threats to rule of law.
With elections just over the horizon, Viktor Orban is ramping up his attacks on migration.
I was truly shocked when a slim majority voted for Brexit a year ago, on June 23. It was to be the first shock caused by an election outcome in 2016 in which populists whipped up popular resentment and won. The question troubling me since: When is it going to stop? When's the world coming to its senses?
The premise of EU membership as a "carrot" for reforms at the national level is appealing, but recent developments both within and outside the Union have shown its efficacy to be tenuous.
If anyone thought 2016 would bring with it a change in approach by Hungary's ruling Fidesz Party they were sadly mistaken. Since the beginning of the year Hungary has seen a surge in public discontent and street protests opposing proposed constitutional amendments that would provide the government with sweeping anti-terror powers.
The Hungarian prime minister told David Cameron on Thursday that his countrymen are not “parasites” on the British taxpayer
The widely shared feeling of dissatisfaction in the heart of Europe cannot be dismissed simply as a product of people's unrealistic expectations of the change that the fall of communism would create. It is also a reflection of some real backsliding in countries that were once seen as unequivocal reform successes.
Viktor Orban has considered his party's political majority not as a responsibility, but as an opportunity to consolidate his party's grip on the state, media and judiciary. International and European institutions, civil society and human rights organisations, opposition parties, and even the United States, have closely scrutinised and criticised the gradual 'Orbanization' of Hungary.
It looks like PM Victor Orban and his Fidesz party are prepared to take on the whole European Union (EU) in trying to transform Hungary into an authoritarian state. If Orban succeeds in his plans, this will not only harm the Hungarian people and economy, but also the 'European project'.