A&E

Should care for "self-inflicted" alcohol, drug, smoking and obesity problems be funded by the NHS? Should cosmetic surgery in any form be available free of charge? Should the most expensive new cancer drugs be funded, even though they only benefit a tiny handful of the population and cost millions?
The yearly discourse of winter NHS strains has reached the public ear. What's more, people can distinguish between the NHS generally, which they know to offer the highest quality and the NHS in winter, where there is more concern.
During my first attack my left side went numb and left me thinking I had had a stroke; with no headache I had no clue that the culprit was migraine. An out-of-hours GP sent me straight to accident and emergency.
This spectrum of care that vacillates between the brilliant and the dreadful cannot be allowed to continue, it is not cost effective for starters! I hope the powers that be are coming up with a plan that will allow the NHS to do what it does best - primary care, emergency care and the very specialised life-saving stuff.
The £700million 'winter crisis funding" the Government is throwing at the problem is too little, too late. It is intended to avert political embarrassment in the run up to the election. Sadly it's unlikely to have much impact on the conditions for patients or staff in our A&Es this winter.
It's good news that crime is falling and our cities, towns and neighbourhoods are becoming safer. But there is much more to be done. It is alarming to see that the very people we depend on are being beaten up just for doing their job. They need to be treated with respect.
The concept is welcome, but it has its doubters. Can such patients really be identified? Won't identifying them and paying more attention to their care just highlight more reasons they need to go to A&E? Won't this simply shift pressure from A&E departments to GP practices?
Nurses are some of the country's toughest men and women, but for these brave caregivers the devastation became too much as
Whilst I am not absolving any of us of our part in clogging up waiting rooms unnecessarily or putting extra pressure on GPs by bothering them with our sniffles, changing our behaviour is clearly not just a matter of information and education.
A new poll suggests GPs have little faith in the Government's ability to ease pressure on A&E services. Although a third