assad

Pacifism is a wonderful ideal but in these circumstances it is merely a pipe dream
'I can’t move on with my life when I see the same murders and killing of the people I grew up with all over again with the same horrible weapons'.
What is crucial in this crisis is the work being done by civil society, activists and journalists to monitor and document human rights violations and abuses. They work to shine a light on truth, and both record what has happened so it can be used in evidence in the transitional justice process, but also to confront the world with a tragedy that will not end.
Plaid Cymru MPs stand ready to discuss a proper peace plan in Westminster and would welcome any attempt by the UK Government to facilitate a diplomatic solution that involved all the major powers. The United Kingdom and the international community must step up. The responsibility lies on the UK Government to forge a diplomatic solution to this problem that ensures that a plan for peace prevails.
History may well remember President Trump's decision last night as a critical juncture in Syria's tragedy. But without a comprehensive strategy to curtail Assad's crimes and bring peace, then stability, and in time justice to Syria one night of limited airstrikes will hang in history as an empty gesture that failed to save lives and hampered global efforts to build legitimate and lasting multilateral mechanisms for civilian protection and atrocity prevention.
These airstrikes are, therefore, impelled much more by self-interest than by compassion or a commitment to support the anti-Assad forces. Rather than being prompted by the deaths of "beautiful babies", the airstrikes more likely constitute an attempt by Trump to bolster his own image; they enable Trump to present himself as more forceful than his predecessor, and can be used to counter the narrative that he is in Putin's pocket.
I will never forget the first time I saw the infamous Vietnam War protest poster, titled "Q: And babies? A: And Babies." As
Even incorrigible liberals like me need to remind ourselves sometimes that however miserable we might feel about Brexit or Trump, we face nothing a fraction as terrifying as what the Muslims of Srebrenica faced in 1995, or what the people of Syria have been facing for the past six years.
Saydnaya is a place of unimaginable terror. Even when you know about the numerous horrors that have already unfolded in Syria in the past half-decade, it chills you to the bone to hear survivors telling you what it was like to be in Saydnaya. The 30 or so former detainees we spoke to have been to hell and back.