CES

A showcase of future technology has been on display at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas - from driverless vehicles, to roll-away TVs and social robots to make people happy.
Hyundai unveiled a car that can walk and climb on wheeled legs at the annual Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas. The 'Elevate' vehicle was designed with the emergency services in mind. But it's unlikely to be appearing at a local dealership any time soon, as it’s only a prototype for now.
We've seen the future and we're on board.
So it's happened again, another cybersecurity uberhack and the world reels from the chaos it has unleashed. But it's not as if it we haven't been warned.
At this year's CES, one of the largest global consumer electronics and consumer technology tradeshows, it was announced that augmented reality, virtual reality and artificial intelligence will be the primary disruptive consumer technologies for the next 20 years...
As part of the personalisation message, AI was one of the most banded about words at the show. No surprises there - it's like a check box that any new gadget or app needs to tick. While the best of intentions is meant, the abundance of its use is starting to lose its appeal.
It's a strange way to start the New Year, but in the first week of January the world's tech industry gathers together in Las Vegas for the Consumer Electronic Show. Now in its 50th year (and my second), the show is a chance for the great and the good to demonstrate their latest innovations to a willing audience of over 175,000 visitors
"There is no element of the work hierarchy where you shouldn't expect to see displacement," says Ming, citing recent McKinsey research which suggests that as much as 40 per cent of a CEO's job can be automated. "I don't think anyone currently owns that problem," she adds.