coca cola

A crisp winter’s evening. The still air is broken by the sound of a church bell ringing. Startled, yet filled with excitement
A crisp winter’s evening. The still air is broken by the sound of a church bell ringing. Startled, yet filled with excitement
The ad features a Saudi dad teaching his daughter how to drive, weeks after the country announced a lifting of the ban on female drivers.
When two weeks ago I wrote to the management of our biggest shopping centre in Liverpool asking them either to stop a visit from the Coca-Cola van or allow alongside it a health promotion display I did not know the furore I would cause or the amount of time I would spend discussing fizzy drinks. I regret neither.
In one week, the Green Party and former Asda boss Andy Clarke have come to the same conclusion: we have to end the use of unnecessary single-use plastics. That perhaps surprising political convergence is a sign of just how far the issue has risen up the agenda.
Just as ExxonMobil became 'the face' of climate change, Coca-Cola stands on the verge of becoming the villain in the story of ocean plastics. Those distinctively contoured bottles with iconic branding aren't such a marketing gift when they're washing up on beaches worldwide.
'Our oceans simply can’t stomach any more of Coca-Cola’s plastic.'
Coca-Cola has been accused of “refusing to take responsibility” for its environmental impact by producing more than 100 billion