countryside alliance

The Prime Minister is right: if you care about eating food produced to the highest standards in the World you need to buy British. But it would make a massive difference if two of the biggest procurers of food in the country - schools and hospitals - listened more closely to their boss!
Getting our planning laws right was a big issue to ensure we protect our green spaces. But the countryside is not just pretty fields and forests; it is a living, breathing environment and the people who live there need to be listened to on all the issues, not just those that make prime time.
The government will today publish long-awaited reforms to the planning system which have been the focus of a bitter dispute
Following George Osborne's third Budget, The Huffington Post bloggers have been giving their expert opinions on what the
A simple stat for you to start: there are four mentions of 'rural' in the Budget document released by the Treasury today (available here) and 13 for 'cities'.
Some readers will recall that not so long ago, in the autumn of 2011, the government released its first stab at trimming down Britain's onerous planning regulations. The National Planning Policy Framework, or NPPF as it became known, was seen by the coalition as a useful new weapon in its battle to control the deficit - more houses, more wealth, more growth.
The price of diesel in rural filling stations is, on average, 4p more than in urban areas, a survey showed today. Cars are
While some might have you believe that the biggest threat facing the countryside is the government's as yet unpublished and yet-to-be voted-on White Paper on planning (otherwise known as the National Planning Policy Framework or NPPF); in truth the biggest danger to our much-loved green spaces is the slow and seemingly irreversible decline of the rural economy.
There have always been those opposed to progress. But we're not talking about the Galileo or the Industrial Revolution here - we're talking about 40 minutes off the journey between London and Birmingham - at a cost of £17 billion of public money! And, when no-one can be quite sure of the scheme's success, it does all seem like a little too high a price to pay.
The Hunting Act has "failed", according to a government minister. As thousands of people prepare to head out to Boxing Day