Food Crisis

Nine years since I was last here, I'm back in South Sudan, the world's newest nation. Part of the work I am doing here, with
Across Somalia, the country worst affected by the Horn of Africa's escalating food crisis, more than half a million people are on the move in epic scenes that show not only the desperate urgency of fundraising appeals but also, sadly, the limits of the aid agencies' reach.
While there are some members of Europe's population who seem to be enjoying a financially sustainable lifestyle, how can authorities help those growing number of food insecure people? Are the efforts put forth to curb the global food crisis enough to solve the enormous problem?
Peter and I talked about bees and the recent initiative at the farm to promote beekeeping. Peter also shared some of the dark, despicable secrets of the commercial bee-keeping industry where bees are literally exploited to death. None of these practices, it should be said, are the biodynamic way.
The emergency in Mali has different characteristics than in Niger. There are no camps or large scale food programmes that one sees in the media where thousands of women queue for rations. However, one of the ways in which it is manifested is in child labour. Thousands of children have dropped out of school to go find work to help support the family.
During the food crisis, nearly 400,000 children in Niger are at risk of severe acute malnutrition because they have not had sufficient food to eat or a balanced diet. At the Tillaberi CRENI (hospital for children) built by Plan and managed by the government, I've met infants severely malnourished and tottering on the brink of death.
The Tuaregs here told me horror stories of pillage and plunder of their livestock, food, homes, clothes and their women - some had been raped and assaulted. Other women were taken from their homes never to be seen again. Other loved ones were missing and presumed dead...
Imagine boarding a train in Birmingham that will zip to London in less than an hour. By 2026 the government hopes this will become a reality with the building of a brand spanking new high-speed rail link from Birmingham to London, courtesy of the tax-payer of course.
How would I rate Rio? 6 out of 10 - maybe even seven if, crucially, what they declared now leads to real action, rather than self satisfaction. And that's now up to our politicians.
Millions of people in Yemen are starving and in desperate need of aid humanitarian workers have warned, just days after a