foraging

Because we all need outdoor entertainment this year.
Learn tips and tricks from wild food experts to use on your next walk.
Want to gather your own food but don't know where to start? We've got you covered.
Foraging for your own food in the wild may seem like a romantic idea, but the practicalities of picking the right berries
It is a growing trend for the authors of seaweed publication to note that amateur seaweed foragers tend to damage marine and foreshore environments. Such books advocate that we 'buy dried' from professional harvesters and or use seaweed infused in tracklements.
Cut thongweed well below the button to ensure its future growth, and don't be greedy. When cooked this seaweed turns runner bean green. Early in the season sea spaghetti cooks in noodle time. Novice seaweed eaters might try serving sea spaghetti 50:50 with wheat pasta. Fresh thong weed is out of season now but you'll find dried in delicatessens and specialist shops.
Nothing says Springtime like a posy of flowers. After the seemingly endless grey of winter, early Spring flowers are a welcome splash of colour and life. They look almost good enough to eat. Which is handy. Because with many of them, you can. So hurrah for edible flowers.
Spring in Britain can be an icy affair but I am always cheered by the bright crimson stems of young rhubarb even its red contrasts the white of snow, as it did recently. Beyond the garden you'll find rhubarb in country lanes and if you are fortunate, you may spy sweet cicely Myrrhis odorata too.
The countryside in spring brings to mind Hardy's story of Tess of the d'Urbervilles and the concern that the butter had a funny twang as a result of the cows having dined on the leaves of wild garlic - wild garlic has both wild scent and a pungent flavour.