i daniel blake

Today is Budget Day, and as the Chancellor addresses Parliament and holds his red case aloft for the journalists, I’m left
Centrepoint's research shows that for each one of those young people we see on the streets, dozens more are sleeping on the sofas of extended family and friends and, in some cases, in the beds of strangers.
Late to the party, I finally watched I, Daniel Blake in my local independent cinema this weekend, overpriced, delicious, and
The reviews of I, Daniel Blake, have already made Director Ken Loach's case for an Oscar, but if such a thing existed, the film would merit an award for critically explaining an aspect of public policy - in this case, the UK's welfare to work system. While Loach's insight into the condition of the poor in twenty-first century Britain speaks for itself, the policy background is less familiar.
Film director is angry at the media, Tories and Labour MPs.
Ken Loach is angry. The 80-year-old, whose career documenting Britain’s social ills on film spans most of his adult life
The lowering of the benefit cap by as much as £6,000 a year from next week will throw some 300,000 children closer to homelessness
The criminalisation of poverty has destroyed more lives in this country than any number of terrorist bombs ever could. Men, women, and children have had their spirits crushed under the juggernaut of despair.