ipsos mori

In many respects, the way in which we talk (and perhaps the way in which we think) about general elections is decades out of date. We bend our understanding of modern events to fit the language that was coined to describe the events of the past and sometimes, even if we are aware of this, we are in danger of being led astray.
It is not all plain sailing for Ukip. Expectations of "what good looks like" on 7 May are so much higher. It takes time to become skilled at running local campaigns on the ground. There are questions about whether the Party has strength in depth, both nationally and locally.
While the referendum has undoubtedly crystallised and possibly accelerated Labour's decline north of the border, the origins of that decline go back much further... It is clear that, for the second year running, Scotland may be at the epi-centre of the country's biggest political event.
The yearly discourse of winter NHS strains has reached the public ear. What's more, people can distinguish between the NHS generally, which they know to offer the highest quality and the NHS in winter, where there is more concern.
Rather than worry about why education is "languishing" as a lesser order issue, perhaps we should see it as a sign of relative success. When we at Ipsos MORI analyse public opinion, we frequently conclude that Britain is better than it perhaps thinks it is. And, judging by what the experts are saying about teaching and what the students are telling us about their hopes and motivations, education may well fall into that category.
...And where our ignorance of immigration ranks Perils of Perception - Global from Ipsos MORI Everyone is wrong about almost
Where does Ed Miliband sit, then, in comparison with other recent leaders of the opposition? On some measures, the leader with the most similar figures is Michael Howard. Ed Miliband scores better than William Hague and Iain Duncan Smith, but this is hardly comforting news.
The truth is that after two years of campaigning the SNP haven't managed to move the ball forward in any game changing way at all. Having failed to become the 'momentum campaign' the SNP went in search of elusive big moments. But to those who have been following events closely the SNP's campaign has been a series of false starts and stumbled half answers.
Britons appear by nature to be pessimistic with regard to the economy. We have now had 11 consecutive months of positive EOI scores - the second longest on record, behind a 15 month period around and following the 1987 general election. If we are to see this optimism to continue into the 2015 general election, it will beat the record by a full eight months.
Politicians from all parties have traditionally struggled to make their rhetoric on immigration chime with the British public's views. New findings from Ipsos MORI showing a divergence of public opinion on the subject, may explain why.