isolation

In short, to show off. To gratify some deep-rooted need to prove that our lives are meaningful, that the events we attend are worthy - to demonstrate to the world that we exist, that we existed, that we once inhabited a small corner of the earth and that our memory can't be erased with the stopping of our hearts.
A new video entitled 'Strange Beasts' has been doing the rounds on social media this week. Directed by Magali Barbé, the film purports to be a trailer for the next generation of augmented reality gaming -- but in actual fact, it is a short fictional work, and a commentary on the increasing encroachment of virtual reality and augmented reality upon our lives.
Living with chronic illness is lonely as fuck. I spend so much time on my own -- more time than I ever expected to spend on my own, or have ever wanted to. There is so, so, much of my life that people don't see.
Being with Glenn means that he loves me for me - he knows I have a learning disability but he doesn't care, he sees past it. It makes me feel safe, he's caring, he understands me, if I have a problem we discuss it. When we go out, he's always holding my hand, that's what I really like about him.
The sad thing is I don't even feel confident anymore going to friends' houses with the two of them. I can't sit down and leave them to wander and I can't follow them both when they go in different directions. Most friends don't need stairgates anymore or don't have to worry about things like hot drinks being grabbed or breakables being within reach.
Yet, many of us are left in the immediate care of a male partner who, quite frankly, will have not a clue about what we have been through. Neither of us may be familiar with the intimate and relentlessness of caring for a tiny babe. We may be struggling to breastfeed. We may well be carrying physical and/or emotional wounds from labour.
Photo credit: Roswitha Chesher We are all living longer. Last year there were half a million people aged 90 and over living
bmm banner.jpg I don't want my sons to share the programming which has crippled me. I don't want them to grow up in a world which victimizes boys for showing weakness and which treats mental health issues without compassion.
Isolation can be a cause of addiction. It's also a common symptom. It might be a chicken or the egg argument, but addicted individuals tend to isolate themselves in order to hide their addiction. On the other hand, isolation can also be the trigger that leads people down the road of substance abuse.
Loneliness is not an illness. Like dehydration or hunger it is the body's call for something crucial it lacks, though like an illness it can be debilitating to an individual, stripping them of their happiness and self esteem, not to mention potentially dangerous physical symptoms, such as high blood pressure. It is recognised and certifiably dangerous, and loneliness isn't nearly as talked about as it should be.