Laughter

Guaranteed to start the weekend with a giggle.
Featuring a perplexed postie, a militant goose and the most unique pronunciation of Worcestershire we've ever heard.
From quarantine memes to silly sketches, comedy is helping the world cope with Covid-19. Here, comedians and psychologists tell us why.
I am learning to get better at taking a breath and saying to myself, 'let go, hold life lightly and find the funny'. I realise in that moment I am OK. And when I am OK, I'm in a far stronger place to help others feel OK too.
Laughter and the appreciation of humour are vital components of adaptive social, emotional and cognitive function. Surprisingly, they are not uniquely human. Primates and apes also enjoy a good chuckle.
The saying goes that laughter is the best medicine and there's no denying the fact that our spirits lift when we smile or laugh. But why exactly is it so therapeutic and what can we do to make sure humour remains a constant component of our everyday lives?
In the midst of hurt and pain of heartbreak, the last thing that you can imagine yourself doing is laughing and yet the benefits of doing so can be extraordinary because laughter is a natural healer. It boosts the production of serotonin, a natural anti-depressant in the body whilst also reducing the levels of stress hormones cortisol, dopamine and epinephrine.
How's your sense of humour? Try this for size... do you find The Trump funny or laughable? Amusing or risible? And are you
Even when we do all the right things, like sleep eight hours a day, eat well and exercise regularly, sometimes we just get sick. We can't help it. When and how we get ill is not necessarily in our control, but how we deal with it is.