microbiome

A recent discovery has been that the bacteria within our gut play an important role in determining our weight. Your "genome" (all the genes that code and make you) is dwarfed by the gut "microbiome" (the microbial genes that reside within your gut) - a massive, highly individualised engine essential to your health.
According to Antonella Gambotto-Burke, mothers are damaging their children by existing in a society that doesn't value motherhood. She longs for a time when children were healthier and happier, but doesn't pinpoint exactly when that might have been.
Insoluble fibre is not people food. Humans can't digest and absorb it like sugar or fat or vitamins. We don't have the enzymes that can break it down, so it stays intact, until it hits the colon where it becomes bacteria food.
My after-the-birth plan also went out the window. I planned to breastfeed on demand, to do lots of skin-to-skin, for my newborn to sleep in a cot beside me, for visitors to arrive only after day 7 and I also wanted to try reusable nappies.
We're benefitting the medical world, whilst getting to know our own bodies better, in turn (hopefully) making them healthier - it's WIN WIN all round. Who knew sharing a womb could be so salubrious?!
The latest scientific research is starting to point to long-term risks associated with Caesareans. Emerging science is linking C-Sections with a significantly increased risk of children developing immune-related conditions including asthma, type 1 diabetes, coeliac disease and obesity.
If we accept that birth has become a multi-billion dollar business around the world, then all expectant parents are consumers of that business. As consumers, all expectant parents have rights and they have a voice. Collectively, theirs is a very powerful voice that can be used as a catalyst to drive change.
The latest scientific research is now starting to indicate that if the baby is not properly seeded with the mother's own bacteria at birth, then the baby's microbiome, in the words of Rodney R Dietert, Professor of Immunotoxicology at Cornell University, is left "incomplete". Consequently, that baby's immune system may never develop to its full potential, leaving that infant with an increased risk of developing one or more serious diseases later in life.