Millennials

The kids are revolting. And they are revolting against stereotyping by the media. That is so typical of them, what with their whining and their egotism and their thinking that they are the centre of the universe. Unless that is stereotyping, in which case I take it back (and taking things back is typical of the lilly-livered, spineless middle aged).
I'd find myself grabbing a woollen jumper to combat the goose bumps inspired by talent shining through or when I recognised myself, some years ago, in these young people at the early stages of their careers. Talent in abundance. Ambition and drive overflowing. Desire to develop and grow. If ever there was evidence that young people are the antithesis of the lazy, lethargic stereotype in the media, this was it.
The gap between Westminster and the millennial generation is widening all the time. Not least because the problem has been badly misdiagnosed. It's not young people that are disengaged with politics. It's politicians that are disengaged from young people.
If you're not used to it, saying no feels really shitty at first. Like you're letting people down, somehow not engaging with life as much as you should be. FOMO - "fear of missing out" - plays a huge part in this.
My fear is only that we are putting out images that strive to hide anything anyone anywhere may think of as flawed. We are transforming the selfie from something strong and good and fun into just another outlet for the perseverance of perfection. Not to mention, we are destroying another art form: the candid photo.
Across the world medium-sized businesses have been fueling the economic recovery. In Germany, the core groups of around 1,400 Mittelstand firms have become the main 'stokers' of its economic firepower. In the UK, mid-sized firms grew 5% over the past five years, outperforming both small companies and large corporations.
Lazy, social media obsessed and filled with a sense of entitlement. The all too familiar criticisms that levelled at Generation Yers today. Like millions of others born between the early 1980s until the early 2000s, I'm part of a group that everybody seems to have an opinion on. We're a group who can't focus on anything, a 'boomerang generation' who run back to their parents every time they face a problem and expect a glittering career to be handed to them on a plate.
The Millennials don't have it easy. Generation Y were brought up to believe they could have it all, and yet find their employment prospects gloomy, the housing ladder out of reach, and ahead of them an aging population they will be required to pay for in years to come.That, of course, is all before they have to worry about their love lives. As well-meaning columnists wring their hands in angst at the sexting and snap-chatting, teenagers in the UK will be counting themselves lucky this autumn that public displays of affection are their absolute right, even if their parents don't necessarily approve.
All in all, it was a lonely existence in which no one ever wanted to put my iPod on shuffle at gatherings. And then I moved to the UK.
November is a time to think and convince. It is a time to have an impact. It is a time to be bold and audacious. It is a time to inject some oomph into your business.