new mums

A quarter of women are not asked about their mental health at their six-week check, according to new research.
The singer was giving a rare interview about motherhood.
A friend of mine has just had her baby. She's knackered, milky, blissed out, and then knackered again. Our beloved NHS got her baby out safely - gosh, how easy it is to forget that no matter how tough a labour experience we have, we are so very lucky.
I look back now at photos of my younger mum self (not just that hilarious post-birth picture) and, beneath the love and contentment, I can still feel how green I was. How unsure I was. I remember that first night at home with her like it was yesterday. 'What on earth do we do with her? Can we put her down, do you think?'.
I know that you want the best for your precious baby. You've spent nine gruelling months providing a safe and comfortable home for the life you and your partner created together. The physical changes, aches and pains and the emotional rollercoaster ride is a challenge for even the most straightforward of pregnancies.
I have to check. I have to know that the scenario I have created in my head isn't playing out behind that door. Behind that door is where my daughter sleeps, completely unaware that this is the eighth time I have been in to her room to film her making that weird sound she makes in her sleep.
But every day you will feel the love. The pure, infinite, limitless love which beats in you like another organ. The love that is embedded in you, attached to your soul, which can never be removed, no matter what. The love that is now part of your identity, the relentless, all-encompassing love that you have for your child.
Would you consider yourself a high achiever? It may come as a surprise but being a high achiever when it comes to having a baby may not be to your advantage.